• Does Job Hopping Hurt Your Employment Chances?






    Frowned upon by HR departments, job-hopping has become common in today’s challenging employment environment. For many people, moving from one company to the next after only a year or two has become a matter of economic necessity rather than a sign of poor job or people skills. Many people aren’t job hopping because they want to but because they have too. Ever since the start of the recession, U.S. businesses have been engaging in onerous employment practices to save money that have undermined employee loyalty and caused more workers to look for greener pastures. At the height of the recession

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  • Can New Start-Up Schools Teach You How to Be an Entrepreneur?






    There’s a new educational movement afoot that preaches the value of experiential education over academia. The new generation of tech entrepreneurs argues that a college education doesn’t impart the skills they need to succeed as modern entrepreneurs. Rather than lectures on economics and business management, today’s young Turks are impatient to launch their own start-ups. They think the best way to further their dreams is to jump in at the deep end and see whether they sink or swim. They argue that on-the-job learning will get them farther faster than a bachelor’s degree. Some of the start-up nouveau riche are putting their

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  • Learn to Recognize New Work Opportunities






    Finding great new career opportunities in today’s job market might seem unlikely given the still high rate of unemployment and stagnant job market; but they’re out there. The trick, of course, is learning to recognize new opportunities when you see them. Many of the most exciting new career options are entrepreneurial in nature and won’t be found in the classifieds on Monster.com. To take advantage of these unique opportunities, you may have to reinvent your career and take a few risks; but most of the people who take the plunge never look back. The experiences of several of these new entrepreneurs,

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  • Grab New Opportunities to Reinvent Yourself






    There are lots of people out there who have had the courage and foresight to grab new opportunities to reinvent themselves — and you can too. Despite the poor economy, opportunities to begin a new and more rewarding career are out there. The New York Times recently ran an article spotlighting people who saw a new opportunity to reinvent and revitalize their career and grabbed it. While the Times article focused on workers over the age of 50, a demographic that seems to have suffered more than its share of layoffs ad downsizing during the recession, people of any age can

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  • Work Reimagined Powers Up LinkedIn to Redefine Internet Job Hunting






    Zoondy isn’t the only one breaking new ground to innovate internet employment opportunities. AARP has partnered with LinkedIn to develop a new online job-search approach. While AARP is obviously invested in finding jobs for its core constituents, adults over the age of 50; its new online employment service, called Work Reimagined, is designed to benefit job seekers of all ages. In fact, participating corporate employers had to sign a pledge agreeing to recruit across all age groups. So what’s so different about Work Reimagined? Advertised as a completely new approach to internet job hunting, the service was built to assist experienced

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  • Matching Your Skills to New Career Opportunities






    We have been programmed by industry, college degree programs and even want ads to departmentalize both work skills and work opportunities. We think of jobs by industry and train and educate ourselves to perform in a specific work arena: manufacturing, retail, transportation, medical, legal, etc. Early in our careers, we tend to group our educational and work skills and assign them a single job label: automotive design engineer, fashion retail buyer, teacher, human relations specialist, etc. By departmentalizing our job skills, we self-limit ourselves and make it more difficult to see how our skills can transfer to new opportunities. For

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  • More Tips on Creating a New Career






    When you talk to people who have walked away from a successful career or high-powered job to do something completely different, nearly all of them say the same thing: “I should have done this sooner.” Life is too short to work at a job you don’t enjoy; and too long not to be doing work you find satisfying. Reality check. Given the current economy and unemployment situation, most people today aren’t in a financial position to chuck their job to pursue their dreams. They’re simply happy to have a job. But times won’t always be this tight. We’re already seeing

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  • How to Reinvent Yourself and Create a New Career






    It may be difficult to see the silver lining given the doom-and-gloom economic predictions that are coming out of Washington these days (see our previous post); but it’s there if you look for it and many people are finding it on Zoondy! Zoondy gives you the opportunity to explore new interests and innovative ways of making money. Opening a business on Zoondy allows you to profit from the expertise you’ve gained not only in traditional work fields, but also in hobby and special interest areas. (Click here to find out how Zoondy works.) Many people push off dream jobs until retirement.

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  • ‘What’s in It for Me?’ Replacing Workplace Loyalty






    Once the workplace standard, 30-year-careers capped by gold-watch retirement parties have become a thing of the past. Back in the day, being hired by a company was like getting married. Both employer and employee expected the relationship to last “until death do us part” or at least until retirement at age 65. Today, the employer-employee relationship is more like casual dating. When people accept a job, they expect to stay with the company for no more than 3 to 5 years before moving on. Most of today’s workers will work for 5 to 7 different companies during their lifetimes and

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  • Busting Employment Myths that Hold Us Back






    “You need to build up some business experience before you strike out on your own.” That’s the advice your parents probably gave you when you were starting out. It’s probably the advice they got from their parents, and it’s most likely the advice you passed along to your own children when they graduated and set out to find a job. But it’s bad advice – especially now when unemployment is high and job opportunities are limited. Sure, experience counts; but you can get it just as easily working for yourself as someone else. One of the most perpetuated and self-limiting

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